Very calm God fearing

In Nigeria, the surest path to immortality is perfidy. Nigeria, a land that devours its inhabitants, also walks on its head. When the head is used in walking, knocking against pebbles, metals and wood, chances are that a vein or two or more will burst open in the head and flood the brain with blood. This is what the Yoruba call eje ta si opolo. It’s only an upside-down fatherland with a blood-flooded brain that can still have public institutions named after the late General Sani Abacha and his predecessor, General Ibrahim Babangida. .
Going by the amount of money he stole and stashed abroad, Abacha must have been assured by some genie that he would live forever, snuggling his head on the bosoms of some Indian beauties. It’s only a country walking on its head that can canonise corruption by naming the Kano Stadium after the bloody general from Kano. Before he kicked the bucket, Abacha got the highest national honour in the land, the Grand Commander of the Federal Republic.
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In an article entitled, ‘James Ibori: How a thief almost became Nigeria’s President,’ published online by BBC on February 28, 2012, the British medium says, “The story of how James Ibori went from convicted thief in London in the 1990s, to become governor of a wealthy oil-producing Nigerian state and then to a British prison is a remarkable one.” The news medium went on to say that, “Given slightly different circumstances, according to one observer, it could have seen Ibori in the presidential villa rather than a British cell.”
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After spending four years in a British cell for fraud and money laundering charges, Ibori returned home to a heroic welcome from the Delta State Government headed by Governor Ifeanyi Okowa. He was subsequently honoured with a very fat chieftaincy title. After his release from prison, Ibori visited the family of the late Bayelsa State governor, DSP Alamieyeseigha, who was similarly jailed for corruption.

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